A small piece of Denmark in Mexico

Mexico’s President and Denmark’s Prime Minister joined Group CEO Søren Skou at the inauguration of Lázaro Cárdenas port April 4, 2017. It is Latin America’s first semi-automated port and a sign of A.P. Moller - Maersk’s commitment to Mexico.

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Mexico’s President, Enrique Peña Nieto, and Denmark’s Prime Minister, Lars Løkke Rasmussen, joined A.P. Moller- Maersk Group CEO Søren Skou at the inauguration of Lázaro Cárdenas port.
This Danish investment shows the trust that Mexico inspires among the great companies of the world.
Enrique Peña Nieto, President of Mexico

It’s nearly 10,000 kilometers from home, but for Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen, the new APM Terminals port at Lázaro Cárdenas is still ”a small piece of Denmark”.

Under sunny skies by the shore of the Pacific, Lars Løkke Rasmussen joined Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and A.P. Moller - Maersk CEO Søren Skou this week at a ceremony to inaugurate the deep-water semi-automated Lázaro Cárdenas Terminal 2 project, representing an overall investment of USD 900 million in Mexico’s expanding economy.

It adds 1.2 million TEU annual throughput capacity to Mexico’s port infrastructure and has an immediate impact on local and international trade growth.

“This is a measure of the attractiveness of Mexico and of our confidence in the future of this country,” Group CEO Søren Skou said in a speech at the inauguration.

“As you can all see, the cranes are poised ready to receive vessels and move the containers that keep the global economy running smoothly. And the port is primed to support all of APM Terminals’ customers.”

Trade, growth, jobs

Improved and enlarged transportation infrastructure capacity like Lázaro Cárdenas is needed to accommodate the import demand of the expanding Mexican middle class, as well as products destined for manufacturing centres where they are finished and subsequently re-exported from here to other countries.

I am proud that a Danish company is building a terminal and establishing partnerships here to pave the way for more trade, growth, jobs and prosperity in Mexico.
Lars Løkke Rasmussen, Prime Minister of Denmark
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As you can all see, the cranes are poised ready to receive vessels and move the containers that keep the global economy running smoothly. And the port is primed to support all of APM Terminals’ customers.
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Søren Skou, Group CEO of A.P. Moller - Maersk

Latin America’s most advanced port

The inland gantry cranes, which move containers from the quay to the loading area, are automated, and their operators work from the office – meaning less people in a potentially dangerous area, and more efficient operations. It makes Lázaro Cárdenas the first semi-automated and most advanced port in Latin America.

“Automation will improve efficiency – and this topic is very important in the history of Mexico and Latin America,” says Vice-Admiral Jorge Luis Cruz Ballado, Director General of the Lázaro Cárdenas port.

Almost silently, the gantry cranes roll up to the huge stacks of containers and pick up their designated cargo. With no person in sight, they roll back and drop off their load where it can be taken on by truck or train.

“It will bring down costs – because a ship that is stopped, that is transferring goods, is losing money,” says Ballado. “When operations are faster, it increases efficiency and competitiveness. So it’s a really important topic.

“There are only five of these ports in the world, and one of them is in Lázaro Cárdenas. That’s something we can really be proud of.”

It is the first semi-automated terminal in Latin America and designed to deliver higher productivity and availability for all APM Terminals’ customers, and will contribute to Mexican trade growth by offering a new gateway for commerce between the second largest economy in Latin America and the rest of the world.

“This investment is evidence that Mexico is a trusted place for other nations to establish and expand their businesses,” Enrique Peña Nieto said. “This Danish investment shows the trust that Mexico inspires among the great companies of the world.”

A piece of Denmark

The port is linked by intermodal rail to the US rail network and to Mexico’s most important consumer markets. It will also lower distance and transportation costs by providing a port connection to the inland terminal that connects customers to a network of 250 distribution centers.

“When we see the light blue container ships in the biggest ports of China, Nigeria, Brazil and now here in Lázaro Cárdenas, we see a small piece of Denmark,” said Lars Løkke Rasmussen. “I am proud that a Danish company is building a terminal and establishing partnerships here to pave the way for more trade, growth, jobs and prosperity in Mexico.”

A.P. Moller - Maersk started business in Mexico 23 years ago and now almost all brands from the Transport & Logistics division are operating there, employing around 800 people locally.

“You can all see the results from the collaboration between A.P. Moller - Maersk and Mexico right here as we inaugurate this port,” Søren Skou added. “It is here in the cranes and the containers that are stacked ready to be moved on for customers, and the vessels that will be calling here and linking Lázaro Cárdenas to the rest of the world.”

For more coverage of the inauguration, search for #MexicoToTheMax on social media channels

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“This is a measure of the attractiveness of Mexico and of our confidence in the future of this country,” Group CEO Søren Skou said in a speech at the inauguration.

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